23. Pocahontas (1995) Viewed as a weaker outing for Disney during their strongest era of feature filmmaking, this film features beautiful animation and music while tackling racism  and bigotry in a way that will stick with you.

24. Atlantis: The Lost Empire (2001) Not altogether well received, perhaps compared too closely to the director’s previous films, Beauty and the Beast and Hunchback of Notre Dame, Atlantis nevertheless has some great moments of adventure and mystery, and the design of the characters and setting represent the studio at its best. However, the story is a little thin, and fails to achieve the scope its story sets up.

25. Dinosaur (2000) Innovative animation bolsters a pretty generic script.

26. The Jungle Book (1967) The last film Walt Disney himself had his hands on before he passed on, it’s fitting that it should be one of the studio’s most beloved pictures. A beautiful combination of music, humor, story, and setting with a great group of characters.

27. Melody Time (1948) Disney’s best compilation film. The shorts are all fantastic.

28. The Aristocats (1970) Rewatching this film, I expected it to lose most of its appeal it had for me when I was a child. I was pleasantly surprised to find it amusing as ever. “Everybody Wants to Be a Cat” is a great song and its accompanying animation is perfect.

29. The Rescuers Down Under (1990) Small in scope, and mostly forgotten, the world traveling mouse duo’s escapades in Australia are better than the original in my opinion.

30. Oliver and Company (1988) Slight but fun urban take on the famous Dickens’ tale. Billy Joel provides the tuneage to Oliver’s capers.

31. Wreck-It-Ralph (2012) Gorgeous, lively animation to go with a clever exploration of video game existentialism.

32. Alice in Wonderland (1951) As an exercise in style and imagination, this feature is one of Disney’s top efforts but the plotless voyage of Alice is more interesting as prose than a motion picture.

33. Big Hero 6 (2014) Its incredible imagery is let down by a somewhat limited origin story. The relationships between the protagonist and his brother and the protagonist and his robot make up for whatever the plot lacks in surprises.

 

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